Are Data Center Resources Having a Renaissance? With Flexential’s Ryan Mallory

Author: Scott Kinka

Watch:

Subscribe:

          

Listen:

Read:

The Bridgecast - Flexential LogoAI is igniting innovation in colocation and data center resources at a pace not seen in decades.  But what do you need to know right now?

In this episode of The Bridge, host Scott Kinka is joined by guest Ryan Mallory, COO at Flexential, to dive into the seismic shifts AI is causing in data centers.

Ryan shares insights on Flexential’s rapid expansion, their game-changing FlexAnywhere® platform, and why emotional intelligence is crucial for industry leaders.

Tune in to hear about the future of data centers and the exciting developments shaping this critical infrastructure.


Topics covered in this episode:

  • Ryan’s background and journey in the tech and data center industry.
  • The current renaissance with data center resources, moving beyond traditional power, pipe, and ping models.
  • The reinvention of the industry around new workloads.
  • Interconnection and ecosystem building in data centers.
  • The anticipation of continuous innovation driven by customer workloads.
  • The importance of domestic innovation in driving use cases.
  • Short and long-term predictions for the industry.

    Subscribe to The Bridge wherever you listen to podcasts, and please rate or review the show.
  •  

The Bridgecast - ryan-mallory_HEADSHOT 2ABOUT RYAN MALLORY

As COO for Flexential, Ryan drives operational excellence and performance optimization for the integrated colocation and interconnection portfolio – including colocation services, cloud managed services, backbone, real estate, data center and network operations, design and construction, development, customer experience and support and FPS.

Ryan joined Flexential in 2020 after nearly a decade at Equinix and has more than 25 years of experience building high-performing technical teams for global, hyper-growth technology companies, including UUNET, SAVVIS, Digital Realty, and XO Communications.

Ryan has pioneered the development of a single platform delivering a full suite of hybrid IT infrastructure solutions at all scale levels and brings a deep understanding of interconnection models and emerging edge applications to the Flexential team. The company’s national hybrid FlexAnywhere™ Platform of 41 data centers and industry-leading 100Gbps network backbone underpins the new single hybrid platform which provides secure, low latency connections for thousands of customers worldwide. He is focused on supporting a seamless, unified customer journey with a product portfolio that is aligned to a single, holistic and complete understanding of customer requirements.

Most recently, Ryan was SVP of Global Solutions Enablement for Equinix, working hand-in-hand with the global sales, network platform, software and operations teams. Previously, Ryan led key sales and operations leadership functions for Digital Realty .

Ryan received a bachelor’s degree in International Business from University of Phoenix.

CONTACT RYAN

Web

LinkedIn.

Twitter.

Full Transcript

Scott Kinka:

Hi, and welcome to another episode of The Bridge. My guest on this episode is Ryan Mallory. He’s the COO of Flexential. Ryan, thanks for joining us this morning. 

Ryan Mallory: 

Thanks, Scott. Really appreciate the opportunity. Excited to dive in and be part of The Bridge show here. 

Scott Kinka:

Yeah, well, thank you for doing that. I was just going back in my notes and catching up on previous episodes. We had Jason Carolan on here, gosh. I think it was almost a year ago, the day I looked at my notes and at least the recording. I think it was May 23rd of last year. It was something kind of crazy like that, but it’s so interesting to have you on here roughly a year later. It’s warming up here. Where are we talking to you from? I think your LinkedIn says you’re in Denver. Is that where you are today? 

Ryan Mallory:

Well, first and foremost, I wish you wouldn’t have told me I’m following Jason. He’s a tough act to follow, a super bright guy and somebody who’s just been a cornerstone of our vision and development at the company. But Scott, I live in Denver, but you’re catching me from beautiful Nashville, Tennessee, today. So, I was in town for a couple of speaking events and visiting our data centers here. We’ve got a number of ’em in the Nashville area, so just excited to be part of the bridge and let’s dive in. 

Scott Kinka:

Yeah, Nashville is one of my favourite towns in America, so I love that, too. It’s exploding down there. From a growth perspective, I mean, your footprint is expanding. Is it expanding down there in the national market as well? 

Ryan Mallory: 

Absolutely. And so I always judge cities by the number of cranes that they have up in the downtown. They’re everywhere. Every time I come, it seems that there’s a new high rise, and what that really means is, hey, listen, there’s a lot of people, there’s a lot of industry, there’s a lot going on in Nashville, and so we have six data centers here in the Nashville metro area, and we’re going to expand and put more in here. And so we’re actively in the market looking for more real estate and more power. And this is a market that when we look at, we always try to view our expansions on market sensing from what our customers want, what our partners like y’all want, and really go out there and meet those demands. And this is one of ’em. And so we’ve got a lot going on in the industry. We’re expanding a lot in core markets like Hillsborough, Denver, and Atlanta, and this is going to be one of the areas where you’re going to see some more news from us in the near future. 

Scott Kinka:

Perfect. Well, we’ll unpack a little bit of that expansion and what’s driving that in a couple of minutes. Our guests don’t, maybe don’t know you, so let’s start there. Ryan, tell u, you’re the COO at Flex. You’ve been there for four years but walk us back through the journey if you would. How did you land where you are now? 

Ryan Mallory: 

Great, and I’m somebody who’s been in the industry for a very long time, and somebody asked me not too long ago, Hey, when did you start in the tech space? Data center space? And I’ve been doing this for more than 25 years, and it really started on the network side, really diving in when the internet was launching commercially UN MCI and WorldCom, those types of companies. Then, I made the jump into cable and wireless Americas, and that’s where I really got exposed to the data center industry. We bought Exodus Communications and started to help with the integration there, and that’s when I saw, wow, there are data centers that actually house the equipment that the network connects to. And that’s where I really started to snowball into getting involved in this. You had to stand at Digital Realty Trust managing their interconnection platform and then spent ten years at Equinix, which was just a fantastic experience. When I had the opportunity to look at Flexenital, I found that it had all the same characteristics that Digital Real and Equinix had when I started there. It was a company that was on the cusp of building a very, very strong platform-oriented architecture. They had large-scale data center capabilities, but they had a really strong talent pool to help launch it to the next level of technical relevance. And so it’s not just the data center. It’s the Flex Anywhere platform as well. And that’s what got me so excited about coming over here. It was just this opportunity to be able to drive not only space and power but this solution-oriented architecture that we’re really putting out to the market right now. And so we’ve been catching some tailwinds out there, and it’s been a great ride for four years. 

Scott Kinka: 

That’s awesome. Let’s hop out of work mode for a minute and tell us a little bit about you personally. Interests, family, share something with us. 

Ryan Mallory: 

You bet. You bet. So I’m a huge outdoors person. Anything outdoors is one of the main reasons we live in Colorado, so I love to snowboard, white water raft, fly fish, hike, and, you name it, go outdoors. I’m into it. Married, got two kids. My daughter just graduated from CU Boulder. She’s actually going to go into the tech industry. She’s going to work for HashiCorp Cloud orchestration company, which is now in the process of being purchased by IBM. And my son’s a junior at St. Joe’s in Philly, a big lacrosse player, and he’s going to work for a capital markets firm this summer, so he’s in the mix too. I am super excited, proud, and just blessed to have a great family. My wife supports me in going out and doing what I do, and it really helps keep us all on track. 

Scott Kinka:

So I’m talking to you right now from my home in Westchester, Pennsylvania, which is just outside of Philly, and my undergrad was at LaSalle, which is literally right up the road from St. Joe’s. So, man, I have a lot of history in drinking and frats at St. Joe’s. I’ll just say that. 

Ryan Mallory:

Yep. I’ve become familiar with the mainline, let’s put it that way since he’s been there for sure. 

Scott Kinka:

That’s awesome. So it’s funny to have picked that up. So, I’m getting back to you. I mean, you’ve been in the data center space for quite a long time. You mentioned it’s a who’s who of the domestic headquarters. I would say none of you are domestic, exclusively domestic anymore, but the big data center providers that are headquartered here in the US are awesome. But I mean, as a leader, what’s your superpower? Where do you lean in? 

Ryan Mallory: 

It’s interesting because I think as we all mature through our leadership journeys, they become different things. Early on, it was really about being a technical expert and trying to develop the best technical teams out there. Now, it’s just trying to help develop people, and it’s really about how you help develop the best teams that you can find and help those people grow. I’ve really pivoted to have more of this mindful approach to my leadership style, and I’m a huge student of Lencioni and his five dysfunctions, and everything focuses on trust and constructive conflict or feedback. And so it’s really that this concept of, Hey, how do you have the right leadership mindset? Then how do you work on the business and in the business? And it’s really about how you package that together and help everybody around you. And so it’s really about the development and growth of the teams that I help focus on directly, as well as the organization as a whole. And so I’ve been super fortunate to have great leaders in my past that have helped me develop Steve Smith, who is the CEO at Equinix, and then Charles Myers, who’s now the CEO at Equinix. These are two of my mentors who have just been fantastic in helping me grow and develop these styles. 

Scott Kinka: 

Yeah, that’s awesome, and I totally agree. Our CEO’s catchphrase is best team wins. He’s just totally coaching plan basketball. The hoops guy there constantly shares that. It’s definitely about the people. I love the insight. Super cool. Tell us about it. I would venture to guess that many of our listeners are familiar with Flex, and if they follow the show, perhaps they caught the Jason Carolyn episode that we did a year ago, but for those that don’t, can you give us, we’re in the elevator. Give us the Flexential story. 

 

Navigating the AI Gold Rush: Flexential’s Expansion and Innovation

Ryan Mallory: 

Sure. Flex is a company that evolved from two regional players that were out there, Peak Ten and bios, so they came together, and we have a very distinct product offering around Scaled Edge for 250 kw and above type deployments, retail deployments for co-location and then our cloud and data protection. And so we’re a company that focuses on this huge vacuum gap in the market to address not only the small and medium enterprise but also that scaled edge deployment. And so we’re different from the standpoint that we’ve got a platform that operates not only the data centers and the network, but we’re here to help fill that void where everybody who’s chasing those hyperscale opportunities is leaving on the table for us. And so really, really strongly positioned out there. 

Scott Kinka:

Got it. I also ask the same question about Flexential. What’s the superpower in your mind? What’s the one thing that differentiates you?

Ryan Mallory:

The people. This is a company where I have team members who have never had another job, and so to me, in today’s day and age, it just blows my mind because when I talk to these individuals, and it’s been a roll-up through acquisitions, but they’re like, yeah, I’ve been here for 27 years, and it’s like, wait, what? That’s as long as my entire career, and you never wanted to do something else, and we’re not without our challenges. It’s work. It’s called Work for a reason, but these are people who are so dedicated, and they’re so committed not only to the business but to each other that it just creates such a special place to be part of and really help the company grow and move to that next level. 

Scott Kinka: 

When we talked last year, Jason and I talked about this. We sort of label a technology, and then we run there, and everybody goes and gets some, and this was very much what happened in the cloud. My perception and Jason shared the same, and at the time, he was talking a lot about just your whole story was around, was around hybrid, it was repatriating workloads out of hyper scalers in the back and figuring out how to have all of that stuff live neatly together depending on where it is. Is that still a trend for you guys? Is that a lot of the conversation you’re having today? 

Ryan Mallory: 

It is from the standpoint of our enterprise pursuit, but there’s this thing that’s popped into the market called AI that’s also catching a lot of attention out there, and so it’s influencing those enterprise conversations, but it’s also influencing what the market’s doing as a whole. And so we haven’t lost focus, and you haven’t seen us run to just go do these 50 to a hundred to 200-megawatt type deals. What you’re seeing in AI right now is very similar to what we saw in the Public Cloud in 2015: these edge node deployments aggregate the network services to be able to start pulling the information and create these learning models that are out there. The same exact playbook that we ran in 2015 when I was at Equinix. We’re now running at Flex for AI. We’re tying that into this Flex Anywhere platform, so you have the ability to utilize your legacy private cloud public cloud infrastructure, so think of it as CPU components to now this GPU buzz that’s out there. So, having these edge deployments is just as important as having those early on-ramps. Flex was very fortunate that we caught those tailwinds early on, partnering with companies like yours that were just, and we rely on these partnerships. We don’t ever try to attack this alone. You guys are great partners. We partner with a lot of people in the industry to help address that, and we value that, and that’s what makes this time so exciting. 

Scott Kinka: 

Yeah, I mean completely. And it’s super interesting, too. I hadn’t even thought about what you were talking about because you guys have had some significant wins. We’ve been involved in deals with you and the AI companies themselves. I mean, you’ve announced a couple of pretty big ones recently on the AI platform providers. Can you talk a little bit about that?  

Ryan Mallory: 

Yep. Yeah, and so what we saw early on is companies like Core Weave Applied Digital, they were coming out, and Flex Central is a pretty conservative company, and so we started to look at ’em, and we didn’t want to get a bit like a lot of companies did with some of the crypto buzz or some of these other trends that people saw that were a little flash in the pan. So we took a very, very programmatic approach to this and just made sure that, Hey, what’s the company history? What kind of deployments are they trying to really launch out there? What type of contracts do they have with upstream providers? And that’s what really opened our eyes to, Hey, this is the same type of technology deployment model that we saw with public Cloud. Then you start to get into, Hey, what type of allocations do they have from Nvidia or A MD or others Intel out there to say, Hey, listen, can they actually get these chipsets? Once we started to build this picture, we said, Hey, wait a minute, this is different than a crypto flash in the pan or some advertising flash in the pan networks we’ve seen in the past. So we got in. We were conservative, and we didn’t get well over our ski tips, but we started to craft these edge aggregation points, and that’s really been a cornerstone for us to go forward. Rising tides lift all ships, and so we’ve been fortunate to get on the front end. We’ve got a lot of production aggregation going on. The demand is still there. We’re going to see this evolve for the next 10, 12 years, 15 years. So it’s not going to stop because we’re seeing just the level of interaction with AI, not just on the hyper scaler side, but we’re seeing it in our enterprise vertical as well. And so, kind of pivoting back to that conversation around repatriation from the cloud networks and such, the enterprise is starting to embark on this CPU processing phenomenon that’s out there. We’re seeing it heavily being utilized in healthcare, FinTech, and other aspects. We’re using a ton of IT ourselves to help our customer experience teams, our sales organizations, et cetera. There’s a lot of data out there we’re trying to aggregate and understand. So it’s super interesting and exciting. 

Scott Kinka:

So it’s not just the AI companies themselves that are driving footprint and power consumption for you guys, it’s the enterprises who need places to put this data as well. So that’s creating a crunch. I mean, are we in a mode where you guys are building as fast as people are or people are consuming it as fast as you’re building it? Your expansion has been dramatic of late?  

Ryan Mallory: 

Yes. Yeah, absolutely. We’re in a proverbial gold rush for space, more so for power, and that’s what’s happening right now because you’re having these workloads that take on the AI side and the GPU side that take so much more power, which takes more space. So that’s consuming a lot of the capacity out there. Again, we don’t pursue these really big deals. We’re looking for these edge aggregation nodes, and inside our facilities, we do have large footprints, two to 10 megawatts, but we keep a portion of each one of our facilities for that sub-two 50 KW type customer because that’s really important to us. And so there is that mix out there, but it’s a gold rush, and we’re seeing deals that are being purchased right now out in 27, 28, and people are talking about, okay, great, what do I need or what should I need in 29 and 30? Historically, that’s just not something that we contemplated for a company of our size, 42 data centers across the United States, but now we are, and that’s why we’ve got a large-scale expansion happening in Hillsborough, Oregon. We’re on our fifth data center there. We just announced that it’s a 54-megawatt facility there. Last week, we announced a 22-and-a-half megawatt facility in Denver. We’ve got two facilities under construction in Atlanta. Like I said earlier, Nashville is on the list, Florida, and we’ve got several others in the Midwest, so this is the time to really get focused, catch those tailwinds, and go. We’re super excited about it. 

Scott Kinka:

I think the thing people have a tendency not to really think about in this whole scenario is that, intrinsically, the way you’re building footprint has to change with these GPU-intensive workloads, right? I mean, it’s not just power; you have to be able to burn it. Cool. The power has a sufficient footprint for all of it. Can you talk just a little bit about how the AI phenomenon does not just consume space but sort of changes the way you guys look at building a data center footprint? 

Ryan Mallory: 

Absolutely, and so fortunately, Ential had a design that was built at 50 kw per cabinet. We’ve been doing that high-performance compute-type design for ten-plus years. The industry was just taking a little longer to catch up with that, and so fortunately, we’re able to do that in our standard format today, but what we’re seeing is a much higher demand for things like liquid cooling, these more dense type footprints. So, our model started to look at chilled water loops. We keep those off the floor, but in these newer data centers, they’re all ready pre-AP and ready to go out to the data hall floor to be able to support that. We’re doing liquid-to-chip, cold plate-type deployments, liquid-to-rack and even immersion cooling at scale, and several of our facilities have these requirements. It’s a little early days. People aren’t diving into the immersion quite as much as the liquid-to-rack liquid-to-chip type models, but it’s still early. We haven’t seen that threshold pop above that mid-40 aggregate mid-40 KW aggregate on a rack basis. Yet we are deploying large-scale pods for those AI companies, and so we’re watching it very closely, but we’re excited for what’s happening in the industry, but the level of innovation and it has two kids that are starting to go on their journey out into the professional world, the opportunities that are out there for people that are newer to career are unbelievable. If you approach this with an open mind and a sense of curiosity, your future is nothing but bright and up to the right because there’s just so much opportunity out there to explore. AI is not going to be a hindrance. AI is going to be a catalyst, just like the pot lines were for the phone systems, just like the internet was when I talked about my background. If you embrace the change, you have a huge opportunity for the future opportunity. It’s just so exciting.

 

The Data Center Resources Renaissance

Scott Kinka:

I mean, it feels like a little bit of a renaissance in the data center industry. For many years, COLA was the power pipe in ping conversations. Totally. And it’s not a new industry. I mean, you mentioned that you’ve been at it for 20-some-odd years. A lot of these data center footprints have been around for a very, very long time, but now, all of a sudden, the industry’s reinventing itself around the workloads that are being presented to it, which is just super exciting and really, really interesting to think about. 

Ryan Mallory:

Completely. 

Scott Kinka:

Totally wild. How has that changed the way you guys think about interconnection and ecosystem building around these data centers? I mean, these are not self-contained one-spot workloads, right? They’re interconnected with front ends and tied in across the business. And share a little bit with me about how you guys think about the connection network. I think you guys talk about flex fabric at your core, right? Can you talk a little bit about that?  

Ryan Mallory:

Yes, absolutely. And so this is where we’re very much different than a lot of people out there. We’re not just interested in the set and forget large-scale workloads. We’re trying to create that ecosystem, and mentioning Jason from earlier, his vision around the Flex Anywhere platform and building that network backplane provided a catalyst for us to launch this flex fabric concept. And so, there is a single port aggregation where you can connect to your public cloud assets, your private cloud assets, and your AI cloud AI infrastructure, cloud assets, and access to public internet. But we’re flattening the data center market in the United States, and basically, you can look, act and feel like a tier-one service provider or the largest IT organization out there because you can now distribute your architecture in a way that meets all the needs and requirements of any type of compliance, any type of access capabilities, any type of cost structures that are out there with this network and flex fabric component that’s out there. It’s all coming through our FXP, our Flex Central experience portal, where you can order the capabilities and services online. So it’s super dynamic, and we want that ecosystem effect. We want people to come in and be able to interact with each other and be able to purchase the type of capabilities that they would out in the public markets through a contained ecosystem and feel comfortable doing so, and so this is where just having a good group of leaders to have this vision and then being able to execute on it with a strong team has just been really, really a catalyst for the business. 

Scott Kinka:

So said super simply on that, the flex fabric and the portal experience and the entire people come into your data centers, they connect into your fabric, you’re connected to everybody else and they’re just point and click effectively establishing connectivity out to public clouds, out to application providers, out to people within their own ecosystems that are already on your fabric. 

Ryan Mallory:

Yep. Spot on Scott. That’s exactly the right way to look at it. 

Scott Kinka:

I mean, just think of the years getting back to the power pipe and pin conversation we were having. Just thinking back to the cross-connect days alone of not doing that. Logically, you’re like, Hey, I need you to. I’m going to meet you. Can you pull me a pair of fibres into that? Wow. It’s changed so much, and it’s just exciting to see a business that’s been around for quite some time going through just continuing to innovate, having one of these sort of renaissance periods that are being driven by the workloads that customers are throwing at it. Super interesting. This may be a fun moment to transition to some fun questions because I think there is an interesting little parallel here. One of the questions I would like to ask feels like maybe we may have already answered it, but you don’t have to give the technical answer. I’m looking for a shameless prediction from you. We’re going to come back and look at this episode later. Give me something in the next 18 to 24 months. Does it need to be technology and business? But it certainly can be. I mean, you can make a sports prediction. It doesn’t matter. Throw something up against the wall for us. 

Ryan Mallory:

The Steelers will have another mediocre ear. I’m a huge Steelers fan, but we had Russ Wilson in Denver last year. He’s now in Pittsburgh, so it’s going to be a tough year for the Steelers. But all kidding, aside from a technology perspective, we are just going to see the pace of change continue to accelerate and the need for just being so specific and accurate from a service provider’s perspective on what we are building. How are we building? It’s just the industry is going to become so micro-focused that on the ability to execute, it’s just going to be crazy. One of the big disruptors that will come not in the next 24 months, but maybe in the next 48 months, is going to be these chip fabs that are all being built in Arizona and Ohio. If they can get them online and stay on time to execute that, we are going to see the next tidal wave come from capacity and demand, which is out there because that’s kind of the linchpin right now. You’ve seen Nvidia ramp up from a couple hundred thousand to a couple of million GPU chip sets a year to what happens when we get that production at scale on shore with Nvidia MD, Intel and others. That’s the next tidal wave coming. So that’s what we’re watching, and we’re trying to plan for as well because that’s when you start to see wholesale, large-scale GPU computing as a service come online. 

 

The Role of Emotional Intelligence in Leadership

Scott Kinka: 

And it’s potentially a significant change economically. I mean, right now, the chipsets are not being driven from onshore. The manufacturing is not. So, to some extent, this is a shared growth model, and I mean, certainly, you want it to be I’m as global as the next guy, but being able not to be tied to non-US manufacturing for this growth is something that could be really super interesting, particularly when the innovations, it’s hard when the use case innovation is oftentimes domestically driven, but the technology needed to make it happen has to be bought elsewhere. So it’ll be super interesting to track that. Alright, well, that was a good one. Let’s talk about what you’re reading right now. You mentioned a little bit about your leadership style and some of the things going on, but it could be fiction. Also, what’s on the end table right now? Oh, there it is. Yep. Right. 

Ryan Mallory: 

Never split the difference. So, by Chris Boss, it’s a great book. It’s about getting into the psychological aspects of not just negotiating but understanding counterparts that you’re dealing with in the business. Again, this goes back to kind of that mindfulness that I was talking about that I’m trying to really focus on as a leader, not just working on the business and in the business, but this is more about that mindful approach to not only understanding people that you’re interacting with but understanding your own emotions and how do you control those and how do you align because I’ve been told I’m a higher energy person and we’ll just drive forward and it’s really about, hey, making sure that you slow down and take time to think through the situations impacts and others. So I love the book. I’m just gobbling it up. I spent a lot of time on planes and driving through that, and I’ve got a couple more on my nightstand that I’m going to dive into next. 

Scott Kinka:

Got it from the title and then your description. They didn’t match immediately in my head because you were, like, never split the difference. I think this is like a don’t lose any negotiation kind of book, and it did not end up going. They didn’t match the description there. And it’s funny. We’ve had this conversation a couple of times on the show about how I’m a big fan of all the writing around emotional intelligence. There’s a book I give out to so many people called the Emotional Intelligence QuickBooks, and it starts a lot that way. Every interaction has different relationships, but the first one is what are you bringing to the party before you start the two-way negotiation? The second one is trying to put yourself kind of in a place of empathy for the other person. If you can get that, then the negotiation part becomes a lot easier. Then you’re in a situation together, but you’re totally. It sounds like I don’t want to say similar, but it sounds like it’s in somewhat of the same vein. 

Ryan Mallory:

It’s all in that same vein. I’m a huge person who thinks EQ is what we’ve got to spend more time on as a leader. Probably one of the authors that had the most impact on me was Carol Dweck, this mindfulness thoughtful approach to how you think and act, and had I read it, probably when I had kids, I would’ve been a much better dad versus reading it after they were ready to go out to college because it was really about, Hey man, these are all the things I did wrong not only from a parent perspective but a career perspective. 

Scott Kinka:

I just had my second of three graduate college degrees, and yet you do the same thing. You look back, and you’re like, wow, it’s amazing. They made it here after the amount that I broke. 

Ryan Mallory: 

Especially, there’s no handbook, Hey, I’m fumbling through this and there’s no Galaxy Guide to Parenthood. 

Scott Kinka: 

Exactly, exactly. I can’t do basic carpentry, but somehow, I raised two children and got them out of college. The third one is a work in progress, so we’ll see where that lands, but he’s doing great. Alright, last one and then I’m going to let you go. You’ve been so generous with your time this morning. Fun question. We like to ask people in some dystopian future that we have out there, and you are left with only one functioning app on your phone. What would it be? 

Ryan Mallory: 

Great question. I would probably have to say the weather app. I’m just, because being an outdoors person, that’s what I spend all my time looking at in the winter. I’m trying to figure out when the storms are coming so I can ride some powder in the springtime. I’m trying to figure out what the temps are to control the runoff. We’re big whitewater rafters. We also do some recreational farming and stuff like that on the side, so I’m always trying to figure out when it’s going to rain. Being in the West, rain is just a gift that is so inconsistent. So the weather app is something that I check probably more than I should, and it’s not for anything other than, Hey, I like it from a recreational perspective. It just influences my outside of work so much. 

Scott Kinka: 

Yeah, recreational farming. You are quite the Renaissance man, then, right? Renaissance man presiding over a Renaissance in the data center industry right now. I appreciate that, Ryan. It’s been a pleasure having you on the show, hearing about Ential, and getting insights on what’s going on. I mean, obviously, AI is changing, not just the way we’re working, I mean, but all the way down to how we’re planning footprint and data centers empowering them and a really insightful conversation today. I appreciate the time. 

Ryan Mallory: 

You bet, Scott. It was such a pleasure to be invited. Thank you for the opportunity to talk a little bit about my journey and where Flex is going. I am here anytime to help with any follow-up questions. Thanks again for the opportunity; I really appreciate it. 

Scott Kinka:

You got it, Ryan. Thanks so much and for all of you who hung with us, thanks for staying with us. I hope you enjoyed this episode of the Bridge and we’ll catch you soon on another episode. 

Ryan Mallory: 

You got it. See you now. Thanks.

TAGS

Share:

Experience the Bridgepointe Way

Start today with a no-obligation consultation with one of our experts.

Table of Contents

Related Blog Posts